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Re-Spool Event has Ended

Reel Manufacturers recommend line be changed at least once a year. 

Avoid lost fish due to damage from: 

  • Line breakage due to nicks and abrasion.
  • Exposure to ultra violet rays. 
  • Minerals, dirt or grime from water. 

Take advantage of this once a year opportunity to have our trained staff remove and professionally install new line on all your reels. April 1st to 30th, 2024. 

Fishing Line FAQS

When should I change my fishing line?

There are many factors to consider, but as a general rule, we suggest changing your line once a year.

The type of line, how often you use it, how you store it, and other factors can impact how frequently you should change it.

Replacing your line regularly is an easy and cost-effective way to ensure your next big catch doesn’t get away.

April is an especially good time to replace your line and prepare for the upcoming season. All The Fishin’ Hole locations offer 50% off bulk line until April 30th, and the professional re-spooling is free as always.

How much does it cost to spool my fishing line professionally?

If you take your reel to any of our locations, the service is free! We have a large section of bulk lines to choose from, ranging from entry-level to ultra-premium options which are all 50% off for the month of April until April 30th.

How long does it take to spool my fishing line?

Our professional staff has the experience and equipment to re-spool your line quickly. Stop into any store and our staff would be happy to help you pick out your line and arrange a convenient time to pick up your newly re-spooled reels. The exact time will vary depending on how many reels you bring in.

What are the benefits of having a professional spooling for my fishing reel?

You can have peace of mind that when you hook that big catch, it won’t get away due to your line. Line that hasn’t been spooled with enough tension tends to “jump” the spool the moment slack is given. It also ensures it was put on very evenly, and it’s very difficult to match the evenness of our professional re-spooling machine.

What fishing line should I buy?

How much time do you have? The answer will vary depending on many factors. Our in-store experts will gladly help you select the correct line for your fishing needs.

What are some signs that it's time to replace my fishing line?

You’ll notice discoloration or an intense memory (slinky-like) for monofilament and fluorocarbon. Discoloration is also the first thing to occur for braided lines, followed by UV deterioration, causing them to become rough, fraid, and break easily. UV rays are the number one factor that age your fishing lines. Always store your line in a dark or shaded location.

What are the different kinds of fishing lines?

Monofilament is the most common form of fishing line. It is neutrally buoyant and known for being the most forgiving due to its intense stretchability. Monofilament is also a clear line but can sometimes be dyed in certain colours. It is a polymer line designed to have low visibility in the water.

Fluorocarbon. Some people choose to use fluorocarbon to spool their whole reel. Alternatively, fluorocarbon is also an amazing leader-making material.

Fluorocarbon will sink considerably faster than its monofilament counterpart. It has very minimal stretch compared to monofilament to emphasize the line's sensitivity but is less forgiving. Fluorocarbon leader lines are made to sink identically to the main lines but will typically have a lot more stretch than an average fluorocarbon.

Fluorocarbon also has a smaller diameter than monofilament of the same strength, is invisible underwater, and is more abrasion-resistant than monofilament.

Braided – Although invented in the 50s, It only made a serious appearance on the market over the last 25 years. Usually referred to as superlines, braided lines are more expensive but have a longer lifespan. These are very tough lines with no stretch. This maximizes sensitivity, but it’s also the least forgiving. Braided lines, not being a polymer, are very visible in the water (leaders are recommended), have a much thinner diameter (can be cast much further and sinks much quicker), and must be spooled tight on the reels to avoid getting tangled.

Lead Core—Lead core lines are an alternative to braided lines with a lead core. They have all the same features as braided lines but are much heavier and thicker. They are intended to be trolled only and cannot be cast from a reel.

What causes my fishing line to deteriorate?

Generally, it’s UV exposure and heavy use. Remember to store your line in a dark or shaded location and change it regularly. If your line is breaking even though it’s been replaced recently, take a look at the next question for common reasons the line might break.

What causes my fishing line to break?

There are several factors to consider. First, ask yourself where it broke. Did it break at the Knot? It could have been a bad knot or an old fishing line, and the knot junction could have been the weak spot. Was there a flaw, a nick, or a weakening in the line somewhere? This commonly happens after fighting a large fish and not checking the line for damage before continuing fishing afterward.

Check the eyelets on your rod. Are you missing the ceramic inserts?

Is there damage on the eyelets that would have cut the line during a cast?

Old line in general? If it's breaking at random spots. A lot of the time, that’s a dead giveaway the line is so old it’s deteriorating.

Snags in the water that may have cut the line? Most famously logs or shale,

exceeding the weight capacity of the line is the easiest way to break the line. Weight allowances will always be written on the line spools.

There are many factors to consider, but as a general rule, we suggest changing your line once a year. 

The type of line, how often you use it, how you store it, and other factors can impact how frequently you should change it. 

Replacing your line regularly is an easy and cost-effective way to ensure your next big catch doesn’t get away. 

April is an especially good time to replace your line and prepare for the upcoming season. All The Fishin’ Hole locations offer 50% off bulk line until April 30th, and the professional re-spooling is free as always.

How much does it cost to spool my fishing line professionally?

If you take your reel to any of our locations, the service is free! We have a large section of bulk lines to choose from, ranging from entry-level to ultra-premium options which are all 50% off for the month of April

How long does it take to spool my fishing line?

Our professional staff has the experience and equipment to re-spool your line quickly. Stop into any store and our staff would be happy to help you pick out your line and arrange a convenient time to pick up your newly re-spooled reels.The exact time will vary depending how many reels you bring in.

What are the benefits of having a professional spooling for my fishing reel?

You can have peace of mind that when you hook that big catch, it won’t get away due to your line. Line that hasn’t been spooled with enough tension tends to “jump” the spool the moment slack is given. It also ensures it was put on very evenly, and it’s very difficult to match the evenness of our professional re-spooling machine.

What fishing line should I buy?

How much time do you have? The answer will vary depending on many factors. Our in-store experts will gladly help you select the correct line for your fishing needs.

What are some signs that it's time to replace my fishing line?

You’ll notice discoloration or an intense memory (slinky-like) for monofilament and fluorocarbon. Discoloration is also the first thing to occur for braided lines, followed by UV deterioration, causing them to become rough, fraid, and break easily. UV rays are the number one factor that age your fishing lines. Always store your line in a dark or shaded location. 

What are the different kinds of fishing lines?

Monofilament is the most common form of fishing line. It is neutrally buoyant and known for being the most forgiving due to its intense stretchability. Monofilament is also a clear line but can sometimes be dyed in certain colours. It is a polymer line designed to have low visibility in the water. 


Fluorocarbon -Some people choose to use fluorocarbon to spool their whole reel. Alternatively, fluorocarbon is also an amazing leader-making material. 


Fluorocarbon will sink considerably faster than its monofilament counterpart. It has very minimal stretch compared to monofilament to emphasize the line's sensitivity but is less forgiving. Fluorocarbon leader lines are made to sink identically to the main lines but will typically have a lot more stretch than an average fluorocarbon. 


Fluorocarbon also has a smaller diameter than monofilament of the same strength, is invisible underwater, and is more abrasion-resistant than monofilament.  


Braided – Although invented in the 50s, It only made a serious appearance on the market over the last 25 years. Usually referred to as superlines, braided lines are more expensive but have a longer lifespan. These are very tough lines with no stretch. This maximizes sensitivity, but it’s also the least forgiving. Braided lines, not being a polymer, are very visible in the water (leaders are recommended), have a much thinner diameter (can be cast much further and sinks much quicker), and must be spooled tight on the reels to avoid getting tangled. 


Lead Core—Lead core lines are an alternative to braided lines with a lead core. They have all the same features as braided lines but are much heavier and thicker. They are intended to be trolled only and cannot be cast from a reel.

What causes my fishing line to deteriorate?

Generally, it’s UV exposure and heavy use. Remember to store your line in a dark or shaded location and change it regularly. If your line is breaking even though it’s been replaced recently, take a look at the next question for common reasons the line might break.

What causes my fishing line to break?

There are several factors to consider. First, ask yourself where it broke. Did it break at the Knot? It could have been a bad knot or an old fishing line, and the knot junction could have been the weak spot. Was there a flaw, a nick, or a weakening in the line somewhere? This commonly happens after fighting a large fish and not checking the line for damage before continuing fishing afterward. 

Check the eyelets on your rod. Are you missing the ceramic inserts?

Is there damage on the eyelets that would have cut the line during a cast? 

Old line in general? If it's breaking at random spots. A lot of the time, that’s a dead giveaway the line is so old it’s deteriorating. 

Snags in the water that may have cut the line? Most famously logs or shale, 

exceeding the weight capacity of the line is the easiest way to break the line. Weight allowances will always be written on the line spools. 

If all of these factors have been considered and your line still breaks, I have four words for you: Turn Down Your Drag.

What does a fishing line’s “pound test” or “test strength” mean?

Pound test and test strength both refer to the breaking limitations of the line using weight force as the unit of measurement. The higher the pound test or test strength, the stronger the line is. For example, an 8-lb test breaks after roughly 8 lbs of raw weight works against it. Remember that water objects weigh much less than they do on land. Our experts would happily help you determine the right strength for your needs. 

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